Transforming Caregiver Stress into Compassion Resilience

Who do you think you are? A Leader?

It can be difficult for female solo-entrepeneurs, such as coaches, consultants or therapists who work for themselves, to  claim their right to be identified as a Leader.   I know. I’ve been there.   But leadership is not simply a status defined by a designated role. If you are choosing to step  out on your own, follow your own ideas, vision and direction, and are seeking to enrol others into that vision then yes, you are a leader If you are seeking to make a bigger contribution, leave a lasting legacy, and use your skills to improve the world, then yes, you are a leader If you have the freedom to take action and make decisions that determine the future success of your business then yes, you are a leader  If you are committed to making a difference to your clients’ lives, and ignite conversations that lead them towards new possibilities and change, then yes, you are a leader  If you take responsibility for your circumstances, your actions, your mistakes, and for the growth of the people around you, and invest in them, then yes, you are a leader And if you have the capacity to act as a role model to your colleagues, your children, your friends and community, then yes, ABSOLUTELY, you are a leader  As a woman, you have probably cast yourself in many roles, and now its time to cast yourself as a Leader. Because, the bottom line is, it is the quality of your LEADERSHIP PRESENCE that provides the secure, safe and inspirational foundation from which your clients (and others in your life) can explore new pathways and possibilities and risk deep...

Are You An Embodied Performer?

Embodiment is the process of giving a physical, concrete form to an abstract concept like a principle, or quality. It is the ability to allow ideas and insights to root and take shape in our bodies, so they can find outward expression in effective, tangible actions.  What does this mean for you as a performer? Embodied performers don’t just live in an abstract trance of how they would like things to be, they take the bold action necessary to advocate for themselves as artists, and for their artform. They commit to practices that cultivate the qualities of presence, confidence and ease under pressure. They have the capacity to access a powerful source for physical and emotional creative expression. An embodied performer brings focus and meaning to their practice, and they have the resilience to thrive in the face of set-backs, mistakes, judgement and criticism. Embodied performers align body, breath and movement with intention, purpose and inspiration, supporting a life that is centered in integrity and authenticity. They are courageous enough to confront what is getting in their way, and to risk leaving parts of themselves behind, in order to pursue new habits and behaviours; an embodied approach to life holds that it is possible to release  ourselves from a chain of reactivity, and stay in closer touch with intuition and wisdom. The experience of being embodied arises through somatic and mindful practices – ways of bringing awareness to, and working with, the physical body and its sensations, feelings and moods. Because no matter how much we know something in theory, when we experience stress, it’s our BODY that returns to what it knows best. Because our deepest learning is rooted at a below-conscious level, we repeat behaviours and habits that are now dysfunctional for the job at hand. New research reveals what many enlightened souls have known intuitively all along… that working with the domain of the body is a powerful way to learn, change and transform ourselves. When we re-organize ourselves physically, we also change our state of mind, and ultimately the action we are capable of taking. That’s not surprising, since our physical experience of the world provides the pattern for how we reason about the world; our mind is constantly being shaped by the things we encounter in the physical world. And that’s why it is important that we don’t just understand what we need to do, but we also train our nervous system to support the learning and development of new actions and behaviours (for example, how to...

What Is Somatic Coaching?

Working with the body and somatic practices is, I believe, the key to my own and my clients’ transformations. Here  is a link to an excellent article recently published in Coaching Today by Master Somatic Coach Clare Myatt, who I mentioned in my last post, which does a good job of explaining the value in her personal approach to somatic coaching...

Somatic Workshop for Coaches: London 21st September.

Developing somatic awareness deepens the work practitioners can do with their clients. With improved self-attunement to their stress response, practitioners can monitor themselves and their clients in a moment to moment way. This enhances the relationship in the room, and provides opportunities for the client to practice new ways of being. Master Somatic Coach Clare Myatt (pictured) is running a one day workshop for coaches designed to deepen access to your somatic self – enhance your presence as a practitioner, improve your ability to connect with and assess your client’s state. Clare is a very experienced therapist, coach and workshop leader who specialises in treating trauma and addiction. From my own experience, I know that Clare has a depth of Somatic knowledge that is unsurpassed by many. She is also insightful, wise, compassionate and able to hold a very safe space for experimentation, so this is a highly recommended workshop. For more details go to http://www.claremyatt.co.uk/workshops.html....

Why You Need Impossible Goals

I have just spent a joyful afternoon with a talented singer, helping her discover, and create an IMPOSSIBLE GOAL. But we all know that goals should be SMART, right? Acheivable, measurable, and all that? Well, yes, there are some goals in life perfectly suited to that model. They are the kinds of goals that build the bridge to that next place, the place where your impossible goal is taking you. Because when it comes to excelling in performance, staying committed and motivated in the long term, and mastering your passion, only big, audacious, impossible goals will do. A goal that is powerful enough to transform you, and reshape you, into the performer you desire to be. Leadership consultant and author Tracey Goss has influenced my thinking about creating impossible futures. In her book, The Last Word On Power, she asks a simple, but potent question,“What do you choose to use your life for?”  and its a similar question I put to my clients, What do you choose to use your instrument, your voice, your talent for? And after a little reflection or a lot soul searching, they almost always discover illuminating answers that help them move into inspired and focused action. Because you need to be committed to a  goal that is bigger than THIS  practice, THIS performance, THIS feedback.  You need a big, fat, juicy,  reason why you are choosing THIS kind of life, doing what you are doing now. Take a moment to think about your current goals. Is this goal going to get you out of bed in the morning over the next ten years? Is this goal big enough, impossible enough, that it depends on your full committment to it, and you are prepared to spend a lifetime in pursuit of it because it makes life – and your music – worth playing? A goal that you don’t turn your mind to just when you get to work, or when you get home. Because it encompasses your work and your home. It encompasses who you are being, and becoming. The goal does not, in reality, have to be impossible, but it does need to be bold and worthwhile.  And this is definitely NOT about wishful thinking or pie in the sky visions.  It needs to be purposeful, powerful and relevant. And its okay not know how you will get there, or even if you ever will.  You may fail. But accepting the possibility of failure does not mean you give up pursuing it.  Acceptance is...

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